Comments on the Manufactured Housing Consensus Committee Meeting, Sept 11-13, 2018

I heard from a few folks that attended the Manufactured Housing Consensus Committee (MHCC) meeting held last week in Washington, DC. Since they shared their observations with me, I thought it would provide you with a short summary of the meeting.

Let’s start with what did NOT happen:

HUD did not introduce a new Administrator to oversee the program. As you may recall, the previous administrator and one other high-level manager were removed in December, 2017 (see my post from December 27, 2017 on this topic). But no replacements were announced.

HUD did not include any installers in the discussions. I had hoped that HUD would have invited an installer or two to attend the meeting to try and keep things balanced. But once again, installers were not represented.

Local Code Officials were not invited. I hoped that HUD would invite a few local code officials to participate in this meeting. However, none were invited.

Ok…so let’s talk about what DID occur at this meeting:

The MHCC talked about the HUD Interpretive Bulletin on frost free foundations. Basically, the MHCC wants HUD to withdraw their earlier issued bulletin and allow the states and local governments to have final say in how to protect the manufactured home foundation from frost heave. I personally believe that protecting a foundation from frost heave should be a local or state issue. However, HUD should provide some guidance to help local code enforcers have a better understanding of manufactured home foundations.

The MHCC talked a lot about carports, porches, garages, patio covers and the like. It seems that the discussions suggested that the installer or retailer will need to get much more involved in the design of these after-market structures and as a result, take on additional responsibility. The MHCC wants to add information to the data plate about this. It appears to some folks that this approach is just kicking the can down the road….to the installers and retailers.

The MHCC talked about installation inspectors getting involved in On-Site Completion (SC) inspections. Too bad there were no installation inspectors at the meeting.

They also talked about things like removal of the steel chassis, multi-family manufactured homes and the energy standard (which hasn’t been updated since 1994).  But, not much promise of changes anytime soon.

Looking on the bright side, this was the first face to face meeting of the Manufactured Housing Consensus Committee in a long time (October 2016). So, I guess it is good they met.

Maybe the next time, they will invite some installers!

Keep this in mind!

If any of you attended this meeting and/or would like to add your comments, feel free!

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Let’s Talk About Marriage Line Fastening

A while back we talked about all of the different issues that a professional manufactured home installer needs to know regarding the marriage walls. I thought we should revisit that issue and focus only on the fastening together of the two halves to make the home a single,  solid, integrated structure. Since this is a big topic, I think I will split things up and only discuss the fastening of the floors and walls. Let’s save the roof for a future date.

Your goal should be to make the joint between the home sections as tight as possible. There should be no gaps, and the fasteners must be installed per the manufacturers installation instructions. These fasteners should not split the lumber and must have adequate penetration to secure the home.

Remember that assembly of the home is critical to the home’s ability to survive high winds. A two (or three) section manufactured home must be able to transfer wind loads across the marriage line to the specific walls designed to accept these loads (shear walls), and ultimately into the ground through the anchoring system. Spaces, gaps, voids, etc., between the two sections, can prevent the home from safely handling these loads.

This gap must be shimmed!

It goes without saying that you need to remove all shipping materials (plastic, straps, nails, staples) while you can still access them. Next, look over the marriage line gasket for damaged areas and add new gasketing material where needed. Ask the manufacturer to supply a decent length of extra gasket material to do this.

Look closely where the staple keeps the sections apart.

If you have attended any of my training classes, you know that I think the marriage line gasket is the weakest point in the entire design of a manufactured home. Take a few minutes to make sure the gasket can do its intended job. Consider offering better options, if possible. We can talk about this idea in a future post.

Never work under a suspended load! Support the home with cribbing every time!

Be sure to protect yourself and others at the job site. Use cribbing or other support devices in the event that a home section should fall. Never allow a situation where a worker could be crushed or worse.

For new manufactured homes, the manufacturer will be providing all the fasteners necessary to secure the home sections. If you are not receiving these fasteners, you need to have a serious talk with someone at the factory.

Bring the home sections together as tight as possible. Any gaps between the sections must be shimmed! The manufacturers all say that if the gap is wider then 1”, you need to reposition the home to reduce/eliminate the gap.  Any shims used at the marriage line are generally ¾” thick lumber, wide enough to accept the fastener without splitting. I favor a ¾” x 2 ½” pine firring strip. Be careful not to pull the rim joist away from the floor joists. The same is true at the roof ridge. Don’t pull the top rail or ridge beams away from the roof truss. Ultimately, the fasteners you install should just hold the home tightly together, not be pulling the sections tighter. 

In general, most manufacturers (for homes in wind zone 1) require lagging the floor sections together using a lag screw and washer at each floor joist bay, and staggered from side to side. The lags may be installed at an angle (toe screwed), but not so much of an angle to reduce how far the lag goes into the other joist. You can also drive them straight into the floor joist, but that leaves a bigger hole in the bottom board to repair. At least 1 ½” penetration into the receiving joist is required.

These lags should be staggered and the bottom board patched!

Seal the bottom board with bottom board tape after the lagging is completed. Some manufacturers require additional fasteners at the ends of the home and at any through-the-rim heat duct connection. Be sure to check the manual, specific for the home you are installing.

This manual requires additional fasteners at the floor of the home.

 

Fastening of the walls is getting a bit more complicated with several manufacturers providing different options. Most installations I see still use wood screws (#10 x 4 ½”) 24” apart from the bottom plate to the top plate of the wall. Be careful using lag screws as they can split the wall studs.

Likewise, you need to fasten the marriage line along any openings or door ways with the same fasteners and spacing. I have been seeing some manufacturers sending brackets or plates for fastening the marriage line. Be sure to use the right number of nails per bracket and that you use appropriate length common nails. Not finishing nails, aluminum nails, roofing nails, etc.

Brackets at marriage line opening

Hopefully, this will encourage you to reexamine how you assemble multi-section manufactured homes. Make sure everyone on your crew understands how important this is! We will talk about roof fastening at a future date.

As always, refer to the specific manufacturers installation instructions for every home you install!

Affordability-Installation and the Manufactured Housing Consensus Committee

From my first day working in the Manufactured Housing Industry, I was told how manufactured housing is “affordable” housing, and that preserving affordability was a top priority. Through the years, I saw how adopting new code requirements were often derailed solely based upon their potential impact on the cost of the home. Arc-Fault protection, carbon monoxide alarms, and an energy/insulation standard that is 24 years old are only a few code provisions that are not adopted or updated largely because of their impact on the price tag of the home. 

When it comes to the cost of installation, I think affordability has been forgotten.

Over the past ten years, we watched the roll-out of the installation standard and the installation program which seemed to have an impact on affordability. Let’s take a look at some new requirements that effect affordability:

Bonding/Insurance:  I spoke with a couple installers, and it seems that the average rate is about $300 per year to comply with this HUD installation program requirement. For the independent, self employeed installer, this is quite an added expense. While I am not saying that being bonded and insured is a bad idea, I wonder how many installers have had an action taken against their bond or had a claim made against their insurance. I am sure there have been a few, but are there sufficient claims to justify this added cost? 

Paperwork:   Regardless of which state you are in, you now have an additional paperwork burden. It could be monthly HUD reporting, state labels, decals or certificates. Retailers now have installation disclosures, dispute resolution disclosures, HUD reporting, on top of the existing reporting requirements. time-is-money-create-a-clear-job-description

Recordkeeping:  The dispute resolution program requires all installers to maintain records of every new manufactured home they install for a minimum of three years. Documents such as contracts, checklists, installation manuals, service requests, parts requests, etc., all must be collected and retained.

New Installation Requirements:   There are so many items added to the installation process that directly impact affordability of the home, that I am hesitant to list them.  But consider the added costs of water supply line pressure testing, and anti-scald temperature testing (tub and showers), DWV testing, electrical continuity and operation tests, polarity check, and gas line tests. The costs of acquiring the needed testing equipment and the additional time to conduct these tests have a considerable effect on the price of installation and as a result, the home.

You may be asking yourself “how did installation costs get so out of hand”? In my opinion, it is due to the lack of installer representation on the Manufactured Home Consensus Committee (MHCC) which has the job of advising HUD on these matters. I know that HUD and the MHCC have worked closely with the trade associations in developing the installation standard, but very few installers are members of these associations and few if any were at the table during these discussions.

 

With this in mind, I wanted to inform you all that the next Manufactured Home Consensus Committee meeting is being held on September 11-13, 2018 in Washington D.C. The meetings are open to the public, but I don’t think too many installers will be in attendance. You could email a proposal or comment to the Consensus Committee Click HERE.

Maybe just let them know how all of the changes have impacted the affordability of manufactured housing.

For more information on the Manufactured Home Consensus Committee, Click Here

 

Update on HUD Reporting Forms & Your Comments

Note: This information pertains to HUD licensed manufactured home installers and manufactured home retailers that are located in, or sell homes into states where HUD administers the Manufactured Housing Installation Program.  

If you recall, on May 2, 2018, I posted about the expiration date of the HUD forms that retailers and installers use to comply with the HUD installation program requirements.

HUD Form clip

While it is important that you continue to use these forms and submit the information as in the past, I have recently been made aware that the Office of Management & Budget (OMB) is now reviewing these forms and is seeking input from you.

The OMB is seeking comments on whether the information that you provide HUD on these reporting forms is necessary, and if the reporting forms can be improved for HUD to properly operate the program.

I am attaching the comments that I already provided for your review if interested. Comments on MH Installation Program Reporting Requirements

Also, I am attaching the Federal Register notice with the particulars needed to submit your thoughts. Click here to see the Federal Register Notice

The deadline for comments is August 13, 2018.

Finally, if submitting via email, the email address provided in the notice appears to be in error. Try sending it to:

OIRA_Submission@omb.eop.gov

Do Manufactured Homes Really Need Two Exit Doors?

Every time I talk with a group of building code officials, the issue of exit doors comes up. Most code officials are familiar with the requirements of the International Residential Code (IRC), which only requires one egress (exit) door per home. Many code officials mistakenly think that as long as the manufactured home has one landing and/or stairs that provide a single way of escape from the home, the code has been satisfied. The problem is, when it comes to the design of a manufactured home, the IRC is the wrong code! Instead, The Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards (HUD Code) requirements must be followed – and are different from the IRC. Every professional installer needs to understand the differences. Manufactured homes are designed with two egress doors to allow occupants to escape the home in the event of fire, an intruder, a violent situation, or any other emergency.  

To make the situation worse, installers often permanently disable any exit doors where they didn’t install a landing or stairs. This is an extremely dangerous and risky practice that impedes the ability to escape the home. I know professional installers worry about increased liability, and blocking emergency escape paths puts installers at the greatest risk of all!  So, let’s examine this issue and try to better understand.

 

blocked door 1

How can someone escape through this door?

The HUD code at 3280.105 requires that every manufactured home:

  •   Have two exterior doors, remote from each other
  •   Establish a maximum 35’ path of travel from each bedroom to reach an exit door.
  •   In single section homes, the doors must be at least 12’ apart, in multi-section homes, at least 20’    apart.
  •   Must not be in the same room or group of rooms.
  •    May not open into a garage or other similar structure.
  •   May not be located where a lockable interior door must be used in order to exit.

(see 24 CFR 3280.105 for the exact requirements)

Even though the IRC (or other state or local code) is preempted from the design of the home, professional installers must reconcile the HUD requirement with the state code. The IRC-R-311.3 says that each door must have a landing or floor on each side, not less then the door width. Also, the stair geometry (rise and run of the stairs) must also comply with the IRC or whatever code the local authority has adopted.

 

blocked door 2

A landing and stairs are needed here!

Basically, every manufactured home is designed with an exit or egress system that assures that there is a continuous and unobstructed path to the outside of the home. The system relies on a minimum of two exit doors that allow occupants to escape from the home in any given situation. There are no exceptions to this important safety feature. No one, including the code official, may authorize anything less then the code requirement.  

If you are an industry professional that sells/installs manufactured homes, be certain that you fully understand the code requirements for emergency escape doors. Be certain that every home is completed in a manner to offer the occupants each and every safety feature that the code requires. And finally, if your local building code official does not understand the Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards, share a copy of 24 CFR 3280.105. This issue is too important to ignore.

We will explore more on this issue in our next post.

 

What’s In Your Tool Box?

If you’re like me, you can never have too many tools. But to properly and safely install a manufactured home, there are some special tools that you need to use. I though it might be helpful to put together a list of the top 11 things that every professional installer should have at every job site.  

 Angle finder with a magnetic base.

                We all know that when installing ground anchors, the angle of the straps cannot exceed 60°.  Be sure you have a tool to measure the strap angle to be certain your strap angle is correct. If you don’t have one, purchase an angle finder and  start checking the straps angle. By the way, it is always smart to snap a picture for your installer file!

 

A continuity tester.

                You know that ever installation manual requires that you perform a continuity test on all metal parts in the home that could possibility become energized. Metal parts like the chassis, heat ducts, metal light fixtures, gas lines, water heaters and furnaces, metal siding or metal roofs, range hoods, etc… A continuous path to ground must be present and you need to perform this test to verify all of these metal parts are grounded.

A continuity tester is a must!

 Continuity testerTester

A circuit tester with a GFCI trip button.

                This allows you perform the required operation test throughout the home as well as test GFCI  outlets, and assure that any slave receptacles (receptacles downstream of the actual device) are protected as well. This is also an easy way to check the operation of any switched receptacles.

Grainger tester

An apparatus to perform a water supply line pressure test.

                This device is probably going to have to be fabricated from plumbing parts. It must include a gauge that can measure pressure, and inlets with shut off valves to allow you to introduce water and air pressure into the water piping. Remember to remove the source of air when conducting the test. 

 H2O testing

A manometer (or other testing gauges that measure in increments not greater than 1/10 lbs.) to conduct gas line testing.

                By now you should know about the two required gas line tests; the high-pressure test (3 psi) that checks the piping and the low-pressure test (6-8 oz or 3/8 to 1/2 psi or 10” to 14” of water column) that checks the entire system as well as the connections to the appliance.  Again, this may be an apparatus  you assemble yourself, or maybe purchase an electronic, digital version. If someone else (like the fuel provider), performs this test for you, make certain to provide them with a copy of the proper test procedures from the installation manual, and get receipt or other written proof that the test was conducted for your files.  

 DSC02976

GFCI protected extension cords.

Working in often damp or wet conditions, with a great possibility of cords being stepped on, frayed or otherwise damaged, you want to reduce the risk of electric shock hazzard. All extension cords must be equipped with Ground Fault protection.gfci-power-extensions-tower-manufacturing

A thermometer to check the water temperature at each of the bath tubs, bath tubs/showers or showers.

                Run the water in each tub or shower fixture for 1 minute at the hottest setting and use a thermometer to assure that the water temperature is not greater than 120°. While the fixtures are generally pre-set, I have seen defects that allowed the water temperature to exceed 120°. Don’t take the risk, test the fixtures.

H2O thermometer

A glue bottle.

                In the event that you ever need to replace a wall panel, section of the ceiling, or a section of the floor decking, it is critical for you to glue the panel or decking to the framing members. A ¼” bead of PVA glue (white glue) is generally sufficient.

wood glue

Go/No Go Gauges for water supply lines.

                If you ever have to install a crimp ring on a water supply line, you need to assure that the crimp is done properly and Go/No Go gauge is the only way to do that!

 go No Go

Safety Glasses

                Everyone working at the job site must wear safety glasses. Having a few extra pairs handy is a great idea.  If your crew likes to wear sunglasses on the job site, make sure that they are equipped with shatter resistant lenses and side shields. 


safety glasses

First Aid Kit.

                Every good set crew has a fully equipped first aid kit available. If you don’t have one, a basic kit runs only about $30.

 first aid kit

I am sure that there are some other important tools that I am forgetting. Feel free to drop me a message if you can add to this list.

Embedment Factors? Cohesive Soils? Let’s talk about it!

Looking over a recently revised manufactured home installation manual, (DAPIA approved in Feb. 2018),  I ran across something that I thought was worth a closer look.

In the section of the manual that talks about footings, I found a chart titled “Foundation Embedment Factors for Cohesive Soils” (there is also a chart for Non-Cohesive Soils).

In case you are wondering, cohesive soils are described as clay, or soil with a high clay content, which has cohesive strength. Cohesive soil does not crumble, can be excavated with vertical sides, and is like plastic when wet. Cohesive soil is hard to break up when dry and sticks together when submerged. Cohesive soils include clayey silt, sandy clay, silty clay, clay. 

main-qimg-f089365f7a3cf3c9d2f0a1e78f6c0c53-c

Cohesive Soil

 

On the other hand, non-cohesive soils are loose soils like sand, or sandy soils.

Ultimately, by using these charts and directions, you can increase the maximum load per footing based on the depth that the footing is embedded in the soil.

Let’s try to work through the process.  This manufacturer tells me that a 14’ wide home, in the south (20 psf) roof load zone, with piers spaced 8’ apart, has a pier load of 5640 pounds (per pier).

Image (54)

Since I like to auger round footings, the chart for circular shape footings says that I need a 28” round footing at a soil bearing capacity of 1,500 PSF. But my auger is only 24” diameter! Well, this is where the “Foundation Embedment Factors for Cohesive Soils” chart might come in handy!


Image (55)

Since I can only dig 24″ round footings, I need to start there. The chart for circular footings tells me that a 24” round footing can carry 4710 pounds (again 1,500 Soil bearing capacity). I know my 24” round footing will be 36” deep (for example, to get below the frost line) in a clay (cohesive) soil, so I can multiply the 24” footing capacity by the 1.56 as indicated in the cohesive soils chart and my 24” footing works! (4710 pounds x 1.56=7347 pounds, well beyond the 5640 pound load needed to support the home).

Image (56)

 

It is not as confusing as it seems. You just need to know if your soil is cohesive (clay) or non-cohesive and know the footing size and depth. Use the chart to determine the embedment factor and multiply the footing capacity by the factor from the chart.

A few important things to consider before you start reducing footing sizes. Currently, this is specific to only a few manufacturers. You need to check with the Quality Control Manager at your factories to see if they allow you to utilize embedment factors. One manufacturer told me that they provide these designs only upon request.

Next, you need to have a very thorough understanding of the soil at the job site. You need to have all of your documents in order and make certain that the building code official (and possibly the purchaser) understand how you are calculating these footings sizes/loads. As always, keep good records for your installation files, including copies of these charts.

While I am not an engineer, I do think that the embedment factor is to be applied only to poured in place concrete footings. But you can verify that with the factory. 

Finally, on the one manual I reviewed, there is a big typographical error, labeling the chart for non-cohesive soils, so be cautious. Stay in touch with Quality Control folks and watch for further changes to the manuals. 

How to Train Your Code Official

The one thing that all manufactured home installers and retailers have in common, is that they are all impacted by the state or local building code officials and their approach to manufactured housing. Whether a code official oversteps his authority by requiring unnecessary code provisions, minimizes his role by simply issuing permits and occupancy certificates without any oversight, or if they don’t issue building permits for manufactured homes at all, our work is impacted and far too often, negatively.

Code officials that do not understand the manufactured housing program, ultimately add unnecessary costs to the home and limits our ability to provide high quality, durable, safe and affordable housing.

Today, I want to talk a little about what installers and retailers can do to educate code officials and as a result, better position the manufactured housing industry for the future.

The first thing to remember is that the vast majority of code officials receive no formal training in regards to the manufactured housing program(s). Except for the few states that specifically require code officials to receive training on manufactured homes, very few code officials understand manufactured homes. The industry does a poor job explaining how the manufactured housing program works on behalf of the state/local code enforcers. As a result, we are left with a patchwork of requirements which often result in inferior installations, and also undermine the overall affordability of manufactured housing.

To compound matters, installers, retailers, and manufacturers are reluctant to have business-like discussions with code enforcers and as a result, nothing changes. The industry folks I talk with generally adopt one of two extremes when it comes to this relationship (neither of which is correct). Either they object to the code official simply entering a manufactured home, or they are of the opinion that it is easier, cheaper, or faster to just do everything the building code official asks.  No matter which approach you take, it ultimately supports the notion that either we have something to hide, or that the construction and/or installation of manufactured homes is substandard and needs the code enforcer to improve on the homes design.

Here are a few things that installers and retailers must do to start to get code enforcers to view manufactured housing for what it is: sophisticated, code compliant, safe, high quality, durable and yet affordable housing.

Stop using the term “mobile home”. If it was built before June, 1976, fine, call it a “mobile home”. But today we produce and install “manufactured homes” and the differences are significant. If you want state and local code officials and the home buying public to think that the industry of today is producing and installing the same product that we did over 40+ years ago, then keep using outdated terms. But if we ever have hopes of getting people to understand that the manufactured home of today compares favorably to every other housing product on the market, then we must use proper terminology. 

Accept that you as the installer are the primary source of information for the code official. If you start to improve the building permit application process, you can begin to drive your code official to better understand our program. For example:

  • Provide a copy of your installer license with every installation. The code official is the first line of defense in stopping unlicensed installers. Presenting your license with every permit application, supports the notion that only trained professionals should be installing manufactured homes.      
  • Provide DAPIA approved details (from the installation manuals) to the code official to used to conduct the inspections.  Single page, unapproved pier (or footer) prints do not illustrate that the real installation drawings and details have already been reviewed and approved. Far too many code officials don’t understand that the plan review has already been performed for them!
  • On the other extreme, it seems that too many people just give the code official the entire installation manual and expect them to make sense of it. We should organize the DAPIA approved designs needed for the installation so that they are easily followed. Utilizing a cover sheet is one way to do that. This not only educates the code officials, it is a great tool for installers as well. Click here for a sample that you can use: MH Building Permit Coversheet
  • Be present at the inspections. There is no better time to provide training than this. Bring the DAPIA approved designs (and maybe your copy of the Manufactured Home Construction & Safety Standards) with you and whenever a question is asked, refer to the designs or standards.

 At this point, I know many of you are thinking that you would rather not make waves, and that the code official won’t listen, and a ton of other reasons as to why you prefer the status quo. But, like it or not, the industry is changing and what worked for us in 1976 is not going to work tomorrow.

I was encouraged to learn folks from HUD and SEBA are speaking at a national meeting of code officials in September to discuss installation.  I have been conducting code official training for the past several years, and I can tell you, they are receptive to the message when we present it properly.

Bottom line is that either we start driving the state/local code officials to understand and respect our program, or manufactured housing will go the way of typewriters, telephone booths, and record albums.

 

The Housing Shortage in Nebraska & the Role of Manufactured Housing

Friends,

The article Why Nebraska Has An Amazing Jobs Market But Nobody Is Moving There was published in the WASHINGTON POST last night, and is worth a look (click on the highlighted text above).

Ultimately, it makes us look at the cost of installation as impacting affordability.

I think you will find it interesting.

Let’s Talk About Bottom Board

I know that all too often we take for granted the importance of that black, plastic-like material that stretches under the floor of manufactured homes. Some folks, (and the manufacturer’s installation instructions), call it bottom board. Others call it “underbelly” or “belly board” or some other name, but for today, lets just call it “bottom board”.

Obviously the bottom board is needed to secure and protect the floor insulation, and keep critters out of the floor cavity. But that is only half of the story.

I am certain that you have had your customers ask you why the holes cut in the floor decking for drain lines are often over cut. Why does the factory cut 2 ½” holes for a 2” pipe? What about the big hole for the bathtub “P” trap? We all have seen homeowners stuff insulation around these pipes in an effort to reduce heat loss. But is this necessary?  Not really!

Leaking “P” trap was fixed, but the installer failed to replace the insulation and repair the bottom board!

If you look under the floor decking, you will see cables, drain lines, water supply lines and most likely, un-insulated metal heat ducts. These un-insulated heat ducts keep the entire floor system warm in the winter, and prevent the water pipes from freezing. Since the floor cavity is in a sense “conditioned space” those holes in the floor decking are not a path of heat loss or air infiltration. So, what keeps the outside, unconditioned air from getting inside of the floor cavity? The Bottom Board!!

Water lines in the floor. Be sure to replace the insulation and access panels to keep from freezing!

The bottom board acts as the pressure envelope, which is the primary air barrier to limit air leakage. With that in mind, we should start thinking about the bottom board as less of a part of the transportation system, and more of a thermal component which is critical to the overall performance of the manufactured home’s energy efficiency!

The red line represents the pressure envelope that is intended to contain the conditioned air inside the home.

Consider the impact of every hole, slice, cut, tear or missing access panel of the bottom board.  They all allow unconditioned air to enter the floor cavity. This unconditioned air can cause significant damage to the home. In summer months, it can cause condensation to form on the heat ducts, and promote the growth of mold and mildew. In the winter, it can cause higher heating bills, and could impact consumer comfort.

The manufacturer’s installation instructions all require the installer to “Repair and Seal Bottom Board”.  For new homes, make sure you inspect the bottom board upon delivery, and report any holes, tears or road damage to the manufacturer. If you need to make any repairs, follow the information in the manufacturer’s installation instructions. Replace missing, wet, damaged or dirty insulation. Allowing wet insulation to dry out does not make it as good as new, it must be replaced. Just be sure to maintain the same R value as was originally installed in the floor.

Tape over lag bolts with an approved bottom board tape.

Make certain that the material you use to make any repairs or patches are appropriate for the job. I know a lot of installers use “Flex-Mend” with great success, and it is approved for this application.  If the area to repair is too large, use staples and a backer board of ¼” plywood or similar materials.  On multi-section homes, you should tape over the lags used to secure the floors together.

Be sure to clean the surfaces where the patch is to be applied. The HUD Code clearly states that any patches must be just as durable as the original bottom board material, see 24 CFR 3280.305(g)(6). Duct tape is not approved for bottom board repairs!

Duct Tape is not an approved material for repairing bottom board.

 

If you are a professional installer that is using the Complete Installation Checklist for every home you install, you already know that there is a line item for bottom board holes and tears.

I hope that installers, retailers,  community owners, and consumers are on the lookout for cable television, telephone, or satellite dish service technicians that have no respect for the importance of the bottom board under our homes. Their all too common practice of slicing open the bottom board to fish their cables and wires, must stop!

Bottom Board cut in two places for fishing cables.

Finally, many savvy industry professionals are now performing annual service inspections on their customer’s homes. For those of you that provide this service, make sure bottom board repair/patching is on your inspection checklist. If you don’t offer annual service inspections, maybe you should. It can be a money maker for you, and a money saver for your customers.