Let’s talk about: On-Site Completion

In our previous post we talked about Alternative Construction (click here to view it). This is a special authorization from HUD to allow manufacturers to construct specific homes that do not meet a certain aspect of the Manufactured Home Construction & Safety Standards (MHCSS or HUD Code). Tankless water heaters, accessible showers, garage ready, or two-story homes exceeding the allowable path of travel to an exit door are a few examples. These homes may not meet the letter of the code, but will perform just as well or even better than the MHCSS.

On-Site Completion (SC) is different as the manufactured home (after all site work is done) will meet all aspects of the MHCSS. However, there are certain elements of construction that cannot be completed in the factory, so they will need to be completed at the installation site. For example, a home designed for a stucco or brick exterior may be shipped to the installation location where the stucco or brick can then be applied. Maybe a home was designed for roof dormers or roof extensions, again, these would be added at the installation site. Tile and glass shower enclosures, and completion or installation of a fireplace are a few other examples. These homes would all comply with the MHCSS, but the work can’t be completed until after it is transported to the site.

Tiled Shower enclosures are often completed under On-Site Completion.

 

If you are like me, you might be thinking, why isn’t this addressed as a part of installation? Well, one of the big things that occurred when the manufactured housing law was amended in 2000 was that installation work was somehow separated from construction. So, we ended up with two classifications of work: construction (in the factory) and installation or close- up (occurs on site). However, the line that separates construction and installation is often blurry.

Fireplace and hearth extension along marriage line finished at the site, under On-Site Completion.

 

Even though the federal law was amended almost 18 years ago, the On-Site Completion rule only recently took effect (March 7, 2016), so it is still very new. Through time, many things that are addressed under Alternative Construction may be shifting to On-Site Completion. So keep your eyes open.

Here are the things that installers and retailers should know regarding On-Site Completion (with references to the Manufactured Home Procedural and Enforcement Regulation in the event you want more information than I provide here).

  • The letters “SC” will be included in the serial number of the home. Keep in mind, a manufactured home can have both SC and AC (Alternative Construction) features. 3282.605(a)
  • A Consumer Information Notice must be developed by the manufacturer that explains the process and identifies the work to be completed on site. 3282.603(d)(10)
  • The manufacturer must provide a “Consumer Information Notice” and have it prominently on display in the home (often by the Health Notice in the kitchen). 3282.606(b)

Typical Consumer Notice

  • The retailer (or manufacturer) must provide a copy of the Consumer Information Notice to perspective purchasers before they enter into the sales agreement.  3282.606(c).
  • The manufacturer is required to provide all of the designs to be followed and materials necessary to complete the construction outlined under the On-Site Completion provisions. 3282.608
  • If the manufacturer expects their retailer or installer to perform this work at the job site, the manufacturer is to provide authorization before the work begins. “However, the manufacturer is responsible for the adequacy of all On-Site Completion work regardless of who does the work…” 3282.602(b)
  • Prior to occupancy, the manufacturer must assure that the On-Site Completion work is inspected. This may require inspections by the manufacturer and IPIA (2 separate inspections) or the IPIA can accept the manufacturers inspection (which appears to be the most common approach). 3282.605(c).
  • The homeowner and retailer are to receive a final site inspection report and certification of completion after all inspections have been conducted. 3282.608(m)

I hope that both the professional installer and the retailer understand that this means additional paper work and record keeping.

If you are the professional installer and are expected to perform this work, make certain you have been given the written authority from the manufacturer before you start the work. Maintain this paperwork in your file for the home along with copies of the documentation provided by the manufacturer.

As the retailer, have a record that you provided the Consumer Information Notice to the purchaser before the sale. Have them sign and date the notice, and keep a copy in your home file.

If a retailer or installer is going to accept responsibility for any part of the inspection process, they should assure the authorization to conduct the inspection is received from the manufacturer in writing. Also, keep copies of the construction designs and the “On-Site Inspection Report”.

Finally, always keep in mind that the entire On-Site Completion process is the responsibility of the manufacturer. If you ever are unsure or have questions on the SC process, talk to the manufacturer’s Quality Assurance Manager. He is the one with all the answers!

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