Basics that Every Manufactured Home Professional Should Know. Focus on Modular Homes, Garages & Site Installed Furnaces

In our last post we started taking a closer look at some of the important elements of the manufactured housing law and regulations that you should know. Today, we will look at a few more.

During an installer training class last week, our discussion landed on the difference between a manufactured and modular house. I like to point to 24 CFR 3282.12(c) of the Manufactured Home Procedural & Enforcement Regulations. Simply put, a modular home is ONLY intended to be placed on a permanent foundation, such as a masonry crawlspace or basement. While a manufactured home may be placed on a permanent foundation, it is not required.

Taking it a step further, a modular home is not intended to be moved once it is installed on the basement or crawlspace. A manufactured home must always remain permanently transportable regardless of the foundation used for support.

And finally, a modular home is designed and constructed to the state adopted building code (such as the International Residential Code) while a manufactured home must meet the Manufactured Home Construction & Safety Standards (AKA the HUD Code).

In a nutshell, we should never see a modular home being relocated or moved. They are designed for their specific site to a site-specific code, placed on a basement and often with the transportation components (chassis or carrier) removed. While a manufactured home must always retain the ability to be moved (permanent chassis), it is not restricted to a specific foundation, and is designed and constructed to a federal building code.

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Recently we have been seeing many more manufactured homes with attached garages. To assure that the home can safely and structurally handle a garage, the manufacturer must design and produce that is garage-ready. The process the manufacturer must follow is known as “Alternative Construction”. You may have been introduced to Alternative Construction (AC) in the past whenever a manufactured home had a hinged roof. While we could argue the benefit of the added expense and paperwork required just because the home had a 5/12 roof pitch, there is a huge advantage to going through the Alternative Construction process if you are planning on attaching a garage to a manufactured home.

Garage Ready home being installed.

Alternative Construction is basically an authorization from HUD to the manufacturer to allow them to construct a manufactured home that may not meet a specific provision of the HUD Code, but as a result of the “alternative construction” the home performance of the home is not affected.

So, if the manufacturer produces a “Garage Ready” home that has been evaluated under the Alternative Construction process, you can have confidence that all of the HUD code considerations have been taken into account. Things like the distance from the bedrooms to an exit door (without passing through the garage), that there are no windows looking into the garage, there is fire rated wall and door separating the garage from the home, and the structure of the home can accept any additional loads resulting from the garage attachment.

If you just attach the garage without benefit of the AC process, there is no assurance that the home will remain structural sound and safe as required by the HUD Code, and you assume the liability in the event any issues arise. It is always important to remember that the HUD Code still does not address carbon monoxide alarms. So please make sure you consider this important safety feature when adding a garage to a home.

Consider providing carbon monoxide alarms for homes with attached garages or that contains fuel burning furnaces, water heaters or fireplaces.

 

You should also know that Alternative Construction extends to much more than garages and hinged roofs. Alternative Construction provides a way to customize the manufactured home to fit many of the needs or desires of your customer. Tank-less water heaters and wheel chair accessible showers are common consumer requests that can be provided through the AC process. So, if you or a customer is requesting some non-traditional features in their home, maybe Alternative Construction is the process you should explore. For more information check out 24 CFR 3282.14. Also, an earlier post on this topic.

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On a similar note, did you know that the Manufactured Home Construction & Safety Standards allows for the field installation of the furnace? The HUD Code requires that the manufacturer provide connection points to the air supply and return ducts, but the actual furnace may be provided by the installer.

This is ideal for a manufactured home being placed on a basement or maybe utilizing an alternative fuel source, and no additional approvals is needed. It is provided for right in the code.  For more on this, check out 24 CFR 3280.709(e)(6).

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Ok…that is enough for now, but there is plenty more to talk about in future posts!

The highlighted text will direct you to the referenced requirement. And as always, the views expressed are mine and should not be taken as anything more than my personal opinion.

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