How to Train Your Code Official

The one thing that all manufactured home installers and retailers have in common, is that they are all impacted by the state or local building code officials and their approach to manufactured housing. Whether a code official oversteps his authority by requiring unnecessary code provisions, minimizes his role by simply issuing permits and occupancy certificates without any oversight, or if they don’t issue building permits for manufactured homes at all, our work is impacted and far too often, negatively.

Code officials that do not understand the manufactured housing program, ultimately add unnecessary costs to the home and limits our ability to provide high quality, durable, safe and affordable housing.

Today, I want to talk a little about what installers and retailers can do to educate code officials and as a result, better position the manufactured housing industry for the future.

The first thing to remember is that the vast majority of code officials receive no formal training in regards to the manufactured housing program(s). Except for the few states that specifically require code officials to receive training on manufactured homes, very few code officials understand manufactured homes. The industry does a poor job explaining how the manufactured housing program works on behalf of the state/local code enforcers. As a result, we are left with a patchwork of requirements which often result in inferior installations, and also undermine the overall affordability of manufactured housing.

To compound matters, installers, retailers, and manufacturers are reluctant to have business-like discussions with code enforcers and as a result, nothing changes. The industry folks I talk with generally adopt one of two extremes when it comes to this relationship (neither of which is correct). Either they object to the code official simply entering a manufactured home, or they are of the opinion that it is easier, cheaper, or faster to just do everything the building code official asks.  No matter which approach you take, it ultimately supports the notion that either we have something to hide, or that the construction and/or installation of manufactured homes is substandard and needs the code enforcer to improve on the homes design.

Here are a few things that installers and retailers must do to start to get code enforcers to view manufactured housing for what it is: sophisticated, code compliant, safe, high quality, durable and yet affordable housing.

Stop using the term “mobile home”. If it was built before June, 1976, fine, call it a “mobile home”. But today we produce and install “manufactured homes” and the differences are significant. If you want state and local code officials and the home buying public to think that the industry of today is producing and installing the same product that we did over 40+ years ago, then keep using outdated terms. But if we ever have hopes of getting people to understand that the manufactured home of today compares favorably to every other housing product on the market, then we must use proper terminology. 

Accept that you as the installer are the primary source of information for the code official. If you start to improve the building permit application process, you can begin to drive your code official to better understand our program. For example:

  • Provide a copy of your installer license with every installation. The code official is the first line of defense in stopping unlicensed installers. Presenting your license with every permit application, supports the notion that only trained professionals should be installing manufactured homes.      
  • Provide DAPIA approved details (from the installation manuals) to the code official to used to conduct the inspections.  Single page, unapproved pier (or footer) prints do not illustrate that the real installation drawings and details have already been reviewed and approved. Far too many code officials don’t understand that the plan review has already been performed for them!
  • On the other extreme, it seems that too many people just give the code official the entire installation manual and expect them to make sense of it. We should organize the DAPIA approved designs needed for the installation so that they are easily followed. Utilizing a cover sheet is one way to do that. This not only educates the code officials, it is a great tool for installers as well. Click here for a sample that you can use: MH Building Permit Coversheet
  • Be present at the inspections. There is no better time to provide training than this. Bring the DAPIA approved designs (and maybe your copy of the Manufactured Home Construction & Safety Standards) with you and whenever a question is asked, refer to the designs or standards.

 At this point, I know many of you are thinking that you would rather not make waves, and that the code official won’t listen, and a ton of other reasons as to why you prefer the status quo. But, like it or not, the industry is changing and what worked for us in 1976 is not going to work tomorrow.

I was encouraged to learn folks from HUD and SEBA are speaking at a national meeting of code officials in September to discuss installation.  I have been conducting code official training for the past several years, and I can tell you, they are receptive to the message when we present it properly.

Bottom line is that either we start driving the state/local code officials to understand and respect our program, or manufactured housing will go the way of typewriters, telephone booths, and record albums.

 

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Reminders-HUD Dispute Resolution Webinar-June 27 & Upcoming HUD Installer Trainings

HUD and their contractor, The Savan Group, are holding a webinar on Tuesday, June 27 at 2:00 PM eastern time ( 1:00 PM central) to share information regarding their Dispute Resolution Program.

Installers and retailers of NEW manufactured housing should make a effort to participate in this free webinar, to better understand any possible implications for you and your business.

Pre-registration is required, so CLICK HERE to pre-register. You can also pre-register at: http://www.huddrp.net/events/

I have been informed that this webinar will be recorded for viewing at a later date. Visit http://www.huddrp.net to view the archived webinar.

For installers in need of training for a HUD issued installer license, there are classroom training opportunities on the calendar:

July 17-18, 2017 Elkhart, Indiana

July 19-20, 2017 Jackson, Michigan

August 14-15, 2017 Cilo, Michagan

$120 per person. Pre-registration is required. Contact me for more information: markconte3@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

Personalized Small Group Installer Training Available!

Last week I traveled to New England to present a HUD Manufactured Home Installer Training course specifically for a community owner and his crew so they could get their HUD Manufactured Home Installer License.

Friday morning I received an email from that community owner that I wanted to share:

  • “The course was great and we all learned a lot, but more important the understanding behind the license makes sense. The explanation & knowledge you have from HUD & industry is important to this process… 
    The real installer needs the license attained in this fashion.”

I had to agree! Working with this small group allowed us to focus the training on areas of greatest need, and we were also able to highlight the manufacturers installation manuals specific to the homes they sold/installed.

So retailers, community owners, manufacturers, installers, etc., if you would like to coordinate a HUD approved Manufactured Housing Installer Training for your smaller group, contact me and let’s see what we can work out!

Mark

markconte3@yahoo.com

Working With Code Officials-Part 2 Permitting Process

Last week we talked about why manufactured homes are preempt from local and state building codes. If you haven’t read that post, see my March 13th post “Working with Code Officials-Part 1” before going on.

Today we will begin to talk about the process of getting a building permit and how important it is to a successful project. I know many installers let others (customers, retailers or community owners) take sole responsibility for the building permit, but that needs to change. Your involvement in the permitting process helps assure the project gets off on the right foot. At the very least, make sure you get copies of the documents submitted for the building permit. Then you can know what the code official expects from you!

The first thing to understand is that the vast majority of code officials are only familiar with their particular building code (in most cases the International Residential Code (IRC) or some variation). The problem is that the IRC says very little about manufactured housing (Appendix E), and what it does say is not very useful. Rarely are building code officials trained in the Manufactured Home Installation Standard (24 CFR 3285) or Program (24 CFR 3286). So, it is up to you to get them on the right track. Here are a few steps to follow:

1.       Installer License. As of June 1, 2016, all manufactured home installers must be licensed or certified by their state or HUD everywhere in the country. It is a fair bet that a lot of code officials don’t know this or don’t care. You as a professional installer have invested time and money for your right to install manufactured homes. Make sure you present your credentials as a professional installer along with every permit application. Once the code official starts expecting to see installer licenses with every permit, it will start to weed out the impostors who steal business away from you!

2.       Manufacturer’s Installation Instructions. I generally see one of two scenarios: A one page pier print that has very little usable information; or an entire installation manual containing tons of charts and details that do not apply to the job you are doing. Keep in mind the code official should be inspecting to the designs presented with the application. Highlight the actual charts you need to determine things like pier spacing, footing size, anchor system, fastening charts for multi-section, etc. If you have a design that includes a statement like “If acceptable to the local authority having jurisdiction” that means the issue in question is not addressed in the HUD code and does not preempt the local code.

3.       Understand Local Requirements. If the local code official requires three copies of the permit application, have those three copies ready. If they require a plot plan for every job, have one ready. If they require special forms for manufactured housing, have them completed and ready to hand in! If you don’t know the local requirements, most municipalities have everything you need on their web site.

4.       HUD Requirements. If you are in one of the 13 states where HUD oversees new manufactured home installations (that number is subject to change), your code official may need to sign off on HUD Form 309 (HUD Manufactured Home Installation Certification and Verification Report). Don’t surprise him with this form and expect a signature. Make sure this form is part of the permit application. Also, for more information on HUD requirements, visit: www.maufacturedhousinginstallation.com

Last week, as a few of you pointed out, changing the attitudes of building code officials is not easy. I completely agree, but it has to start sometime and there is no better time than right now.

Stay tuned, next week we will take a look at the inspection process.