Shipped Loose Plumbing-What You Should Expect

It seems that at every installation training or seminar I present, installers and retailers complain that the home manufacturer is not providing the materials needed to complete the drain lines under the manufactured home. So I decided to take a look at this issue and see what we can learn.

The first thing we need to do is see exactly what the Manufactured Home Construction & Safety Standards (HUD Code) says about this.

Check out 24 CFR 3280.610(c)(1)-Drainage systems:

Each manufactured home shall have only one drain outlet.

Ok, now check out 24 CFR 3280.610(c)(5) Preassembly of Drain Lines:

Sections of the drainage system, designed to be located underneath the home, are not required to be factory installed when the manufacturer designs the system for site assembly and also provides all materials and components, including piping, fittings, cement, supports and instructions necessary for proper site installation.

So, when you look at both sections together, it should be pretty clear.  The manufacturer is going to design the drainage system so that all of the individual drain line drops through the floor can be connected to one point AND they must provide all the materials needed for the installer to complete the drainage system according to the provided design.

To know that you are getting all the plumbing parts you are required to receive, you need to look at the design supplied with each new manufactured home shipped from the factory. Generally, this DAPIA approved design is included with the box of other shipped loose parts needed to complete the home. Following this design, you should be able to connect all of the drain line drops to that required “one drain outlet” with materials provided by the manufacturer. 

The materials needed to complete the plumbing in the circled area would be shipped loose inside the home.

 

There is another reason it is important that the manufacturers supply installers with the needed parts and designs to complete the drain line, and it is called “preemption”. HUD has ruled (in a letter dated 12-4-1996) that state or local code enforcement may not require licensed plumbers to assemble shipped loose plumbing. But if you are not installing the drainage system according to the Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standard, (by not following the DAPIA approved design, or using your own materials) then the local code requirements could apply. 

It is important to note that where the drain lines from the home connect to the main sewage connection the local authority has control, and at that connection, a licensed plumber can be required. 

If you are installing manufactured homes in an area that requires licensed plumbers to assemble the drain system, you should consider working with the manufacturers, your state officials, and possibly HUD to end this unnecessary requirement.

If your manufacturer is not shipping these required drain line parts with the home, you should show him 24 CFR 3280.610(c)(5). This is just one more reason why it is important for professional installers to know the HUD Code!

I hope this information is helpful.

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